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How to Do Your Part to Reduce COVID-19 Spread

Published June 15th, 2020 by Remixadmin


Right now, we are all doing our best to keep the spread of COVID-19 manageable for health care systems. Doing so protects healthcare workers, our loved ones, and everyone else from a potentially devastating health system overload. However, it’s hard to know exactly what “doing our best” looks like. Many people are unsure of what they can do as individuals to keep the pandemic manageable. Here are a few ways you can do your part: 

Limit Outings 

So far, research suggests that the virus that causes COVID-19 is mainly spread through respiratory droplets. Most of us know that we send these particles into the air when we cough or sneeze, but you may not realize that you also create these clouds just by talking. For this reason, any place with a lot of people comes with heightened risk of transmission. 

Try to reduce your outings and errands as much as possible. Wear a mask if you must go out for medications, food, and other necessities - and if you can manage it, get those delivered. Many grocery stores have teamed up with delivery services like Instacart to make this possible. Others offer curbside service, so you don’t have to go through the store. Either of these options are safe ways to get your basics. 

If you’re interested in a treat, consider signing up for a convenient and affordable meal kit delivery service. This is a great fun way to make your own food without having a lot of leftover waste. Since all the ingredients are included (apart from some pantry staples, like salt) you don’t have to worry about the store missing something vital or the shopper misunderstanding your list. 

Wash Your Hands 

If you must go out, remember to thoroughly and frequently wash your hands. Mayo Clinic says you should wash them with soap and water after every bathroom trip, and as soon as you come in from outside. You can also use hand sanitizer in a pinch, such between stores if you must make multiple stops, but soap and water is always best. 

Simply running them under water and haphazardly rubbing some soap around is not sufficient - you need to make sure you’re getting all the surfaces on your hand while you wash. Wash for at least twenty seconds (there are tons of song clips you can use to keep track) and be careful to get your palms, between your fingers, and your fingertips, which are all often missed. Online videos are available that illustrate good washing using ink or paint. You can use this same idea as a visualization tool: imagine you’re spreading ink while you wash, and focus on getting the ink on every bit of your hands. 

If You’re Sick: 

There’s no good time of year for a pandemic, but with seasonal allergies being what they are, spring is particularly frustrating. If you start showing signs of COVID-19, try not to panic. Not only are the signs easily mistaken for the common cold, allergies, and many other very minor issues, but CNN explains most people who get COVID-19 recover without medical intervention

If you develop a cough, fever, and shortness of breath, however, you should reach out to your doctor to be tested. Always call your medical provider beforehand and ask if they’d like you to come into their office, or go straight to a hospital. If you test positive, you’ll need to isolate from anyone you live with, and seek additional medical care if things get serious. 

If you don’t have major symptoms but still have a cough, or just feel generally unwell, it’s best to live as if you have tested positive. Absolutely do not go out with a cough or the sniffles. If you know you have seasonal allergies, make sure you take your allergy medication every day to reduce the odds of developing suspicious symptoms. Finally, be sure to always cough or sneeze into your elbow, rather than your hand. 

This is a difficult time, and we are all learning how to live this life as we go along. Focus on finding ways to do your part to keep everyone safe. In doing so, you give your community the best chance to get through this together. 

Photo Credit: Unsplash

Article Credit: Jackie Waters


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